From the Electoral College to Marijuana Reform: State’s Rights Alive and Well in 2017

In the post-election stupor a debate has been re-kindled over the necessity of the Electoral College.  Nevertheless, the same guiding principle that created this system in our democracy, State’s Rights, also empowered voters in California, Nevada, Massachusetts and Maine to legalize the use of marijuana.   How can it be that a majority of the American population voted for Hillary Clinton, by nearly 2 million votes, yet in the state by state count Donald Trump took over the White House?  How can it be that marijuana, a Schedule 1 drug under the federal Controlled Substances Act and in the same category as heroin, is now legal for recreational use for more than 1 in 5 Americans? The Founding Fathers were concerned about a populace that could be easily swayed and wanted certain powers reserved for the states or individuals.  This was the goal of the Bill of Rights.   The Tenth Amendment to our Constitution holds, “The powers not delegated to the

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